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Thread: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

  1. #11
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Colorado also has Uranium in the soil so add that in with altitude and they have a higher "normal" number

  2. #12
    DMac
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Real Time Ionizing radiation detector. Located in New York, Tarrytown. 15 Miles south from Indian Point nuclear Power Plant.


    http://www.aspnic.com/rad/

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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Quote Originally Posted by DMac
    Real Time Ionizing radiation detector. Located in New York, Tarrytown. 15 Miles south from Indian Point nuclear Power Plant.


    http://www.aspnic.com/rad/
    And here is one from Japan, put those two side by side
    http://mu.jklmnop.net/japan/

  4. #14
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    It is raining in So. Cal. now.

    What Have They Done to the Rain?


    It is raining outside right now. And coming down with the rain are measurable -- if trace -- quantities of radioisotopes from Japan's crippled nuclear reactors. What we are being exposed to in California today is not a reflection of the current situation in Japan, though. These winds left Japan right after the first radiation releases, and the situation has gotten significantly worse in the past four days. We are not yet at Chernobyl levels, but this is obviously much worse than Three Mile Island...

    ...health officials in Los Angeles said "Our position has not changed: We still do not expect to see an increase in harmful levels of radiation in California."



    "...What is lacking in all of this are any simple explanation of what the authorities are defining as "harmful," what the possible range of exposures are, and what potential level of releases from Fukushima Daiichi are being taken into account. How bad a scenario are they considering? The information that is being released is unhelpful and won't enable anyone to judge their actual risk. One expert said, intending to be reassuring, that the level being experienced in California was only "one microsievert", about 1/100th of the exposure from a chest X-ray. But one microsievert over what period of time? A week? A day? An hour? A minute? A microsievert a minute is equivalent to a chest X-Ray every two hours -- a very big deal indeed...
    "What Difference, at this time, does it make?"

    "What is 'is'?"

    "Because you'd be in jail"

  5. #15
    Administrator JohnQPublic's Avatar
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Daiichi nuclear plant reaches California; experts: no health risk

    BY Nancy Dillon
    DAILY NEWS WEST COAST BUREAU CHIEF

    Originally Published:Friday, March 18th 2011, 3:41 PM
    Updated: Friday, March 18th 2011, 3:49 PM

    LOS ANGELES - Trace amounts of radiation from Japan's nuclear crisis have reportedly reached California - but they're nowhere near hazardous levels.

    "(They're) about a billion times beneath levels that would be health threatening," a diplomat with access to radiation tracking by the U.N.'s Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization told the Associated Press.

    The diplomat in Vienna said the initial reading came from an unnamed measuring station operated by the CTBTO, apparently in Sacramento.

    Experts agree that any fallout wafting 5,500 miles across the Pacific to California will be too diluted to pose a health risk.

    "It would be less than one microsievert," Dr. Keisuke Iwamoto, a radiation biologist at UCLA, told the Daily News. "To give you some perspective, a chest x-ray might be 100 microsieverts."

    Still, some jittery residents are hoarding anti-radiation pills and fretting over the invisible threat as weather systems beat a path between the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant and California.

    "We've sold maybe 40 or 50 personal radiation detectors to people in California," Al Evan, the CEO of Security Pro USA in Los Angeles, told the Daily News. "Even though the radiation threat is minute, people are very concerned. We sold about a thousand packets of potassium iodide pills in two days. We're sold out."

    California officials, meanwhile, said they're screening locally produced milk for any radiation contamination transmitted by grass-eating cows.

    It's a precautionary measure, they said, since harmful levels are not expected to affect the milk supply.

    An estimated 4,000 kids developed thyroid cancer after consuming milk contaminated with radioactive iodine after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, according to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.





    "What Difference, at this time, does it make?"

    "What is 'is'?"

    "Because you'd be in jail"

  6. #16
    beefsteak
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Jesse's Cafe' American posts this t'day, 3/24/2011

    24 March 2011
    Fukushima Radioactive Fallout Update - Caesium and Iodine About Half Chernobyl Levels

    I do not seem to be hearing this same level of detailed information on the financial news networks anymore. I do not watch network televised news at all, so it could be covered there.

    Apparently I am not the only one who feels this way.

    Lack of Data from Japan Distresses Nuclear Experts - LA Times

    The stock touts on bubblevision are busily promoting blue skies and rainbows ahead of the weekend. Nothing to see here, move along. Just send in your money, and we can have endless prosperity. Or at least some can.

    "New Scientist"
    Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels
    By Debora MacKenzie
    24 March 2011

    Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Austrian researchers have used a worldwide network of radiation detectors designed to spot clandestine nuclear bomb tests to show that iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 per cent of those seen after the 1986 disaster. The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

    The difference between this accident and Chernobyl, they say, is that at Chernobyl a huge fire released large amounts of many radioactive materials, including fuel particles, in smoke. At Fukushima Daiichi, only the volatile elements, such as iodine and caesium, are bubbling off the damaged fuel. But these substances could nevertheless pose a significant health risk outside the plant.

    The organisation set up to verify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) has a global network of air samplers that monitor and trace the origin of around a dozen radionuclides, the radioactive elements released by atomic bomb blasts and nuclear accidents. These measurements can be combined with wind observations to track where the radionuclides come from, and how much was released.

    The level of radionuclides leaking from Fukushima Daiichi has been unclear, but the CTBT air samplers can shed some light, says Gerhard Wotawa of Austria's Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics in Vienna.

    For the first two days after the accident, the wind blew east from Fukushima towards monitoring stations on the US west coast; on the third day it blew south-west over the Japanese monitoring station at Takasaki, then swung east again. Each day, readings for iodine-131 at Sacramento in California, or at Takasaki, both suggested the same amount of iodine was coming out of Fukushima, says Wotawa: 1.2 to 1.3 1017 becquerels per day.

    The agreement between the two "makes us confident that this is accurate", he says. So do similar readings at CTBT stations in Alaska, Hawaii and Montreal, Canada readings at the latter, at least, show that the emissions have continued.

    In the 10 days it burned, Chernobyl put out 1.76 1018 becquerels of iodine-131, which amounts to only 50 per cent more per day than has been calculated for Fukushima Daiichi. It is not yet clear how long emissions from the Japanese plant will continue.

    Similarly, says Wotawa, caesium-137 emissions are on the same order of magnitude as at Chernobyl. The Sacramento readings suggest it has emitted 5 1015 becquerels of caesium-137 per day; Chernobyl put out 8.5 1016 in total around 70 per cent more per day.

    "This is not surprising," says Wotawa. "When the fuel is damaged there is no reason for the volatile elements not to escape," and the measured caesium and iodine are in the right ratios for the fuel used by the Fukushima Daiichi reactors. Also, the Fukushima plant has around 1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site, and an unknown amount has been damaged. The Chernobyl reactor had only 180 tonnes.

    The amounts being released, he says, are "entirely consistent" with the relatively low amounts of caesium and iodine being measured in soil, plants and water in Japan, because so much has blown out to sea. The amounts crossing the Pacific to places like Sacramento are vanishingly small they were detected there because the CTBT network is designed to sniff out the tiniest traces.


    Dangerous isotopes
    The Chernobyl accident emitted much more radioactivity and a wider diversity of radioactive elements than Fukushima Daiichi has so far, but it was iodine and caesium that caused most of the health risk especially outside the immediate area of the Chernobyl plant, says Malcolm Crick, secretary of a United Nations body that has just reviewed the health effects of Chernobyl. Unlike other elements, he says, they were carried far and wide by the wind.

    Moreover the human body absorbs iodine and caesium readily. "Essentially all the iodine or caesium inhaled or swallowed crosses into the blood," says Keith Baverstock, former head of radiation protection for the World Health Organization's European office, who has studied Chernobyl's health effects.

    Iodine is rapidly absorbed by the thyroid, and leaves only as it decays radioactively, with a half-life of eight days. Caesium is absorbed by muscles, where its half-life of 30 years means that it remains until it is excreted by the body. It takes between 10 and 100 days to excrete half of what has been consumed.

    While in the body the isotopes' radioactive emissions can do significant damage, mainly to DNA. Children who ingest iodine-131 can develop thyroid cancer 10 or more years later; adults seem relatively resistant. A study published in the US last week found that iodine-131 from Chernobyl is still causing new cases of thyroid cancer to appear at an undiminished rate in the most heavily affected regions of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia.

    Caesium-137 lingers in the environment because of its long half-life. Researchers are divided over how much damage environmental exposure to low doses has done since Chernobyl. Some researchers think it could still cause thousands of new cases of cancer across Europe.

    Footnote:
    first printed material I've seen here or elsewhere that talks about the body excreting cesium.

    Rense's interview-ee of Starr-Hull, PhD spoke of how to rid the body of radiation using French Green Clay.

    Makes one wonder why we're not supposed to know these things and just carry the poisons around with us until, what...we croak? FWIW, there is an excellent article posted on another forum thread wrt. "Low & Slo" level radiation and its aggressive cellular destructive assault vs large dosages of radiations' cellular assault. A real eye-opener.

    I think MIC can also easily be considered the abbreviation for MEDICAL INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX a manipulative agenda to keep ObamaCare in place. uke

  7. #17
    Administrator JohnQPublic's Avatar
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    This is not good:

    http://youtu.be/BnRMS71OpCY
    "What Difference, at this time, does it make?"

    "What is 'is'?"

    "Because you'd be in jail"

  8. #18
    beefsteak
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Agreed! Thanks John Q.

  9. #19
    beefsteak
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    http://www.radiationnetwork.com/ is STILL the link that is working 1/24/2012.

    MNEagle is able to make this forum "see" it. I'm not that skilled a poster.


    beefsteak

  10. #20
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    Re: Radiation Network - real time environmental radiation levels across the USA

    Quote Originally Posted by undgrd
    Denver will always be higher because of elevation.
    Quote Originally Posted by lapis View Post
    It's now at 74. Does that mean it's getting more of the Japanese radiation than the west coast?

    Radiation in Denver versus Tokyo...

    According to this, the total annual background exposure in Denver is 11.8 MILLIsieverts per year, which is 11,800 microsieverts per year, which is 32 microsieverts per day, which is 1.3 microsieverts per hour.
    http://isis-online.org/risk/tab7
    Current rate in Tokyo is 0.049 microsieverts per hour. The Denver rate is 27 times the current Tokyo rate, primarily due to radon gas in Denver, but that is not quite right and is an overestimate because it depends what is included and excluded, outdoors versus indoors, etc.


    The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends evacuation of a locality whenever the excess radiation dose exceeds .1 rem per year. But that's one-third of what I call the "Denver dose." Applied strictly, the ICRP standard would seem to require the immediate evacuation of Denver.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...444059332.html

    Suffering from Rocky Flats...

    Denver suffers from the long term effects of the incident at Rocky Flats where they used to manufacture the triggers for Hydrogen bombs, (small saucer shaped ingots of Plutonium). A similar event to that here in the UK some years earlier at Calder Hall, where the dust filters were contaminated with radioactive dust and caught fire.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Flats_Plant
    http://www.lm.doe.gov/rocky_flats/Sites.aspx
    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play. How about a nice game of chess?

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